Tag Archives: sugar-free gum

How to Treat Dry Mouth

How to Treat Dry Mouth at Home With Chewing Gum

Dry mouth, or xerostomia, occurs when your salivary glands don’t produce enough saliva, creating discomfort. This condition can be caused by a variety of conditions or as a side effect of medication. If you suffer from it, you may wonder how to treat dry mouth at home. Chewing gum is an option that may work for you.

Dry mouth can range from being mildly uncomfortable to downright painful, and chronic cases cause more than just pain. According to the Mayo Clinic, chronic dry mouth can cause tooth decay, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, and even gum disease.

Luckily, there is a simple solution: increasing salivation by chewing sugar-free chewing gum. The act of chewing gum itself can increase salivation by up to 10 times the normal rate. The increased salivary flow can help neutralize and wash away the acids that are produced when food is broken down by the bacteria in plaque on teeth. Chewing gum to the rescue!

We hear from many Glee Gum fans who chew our all-natural gum as a way to treat their dry mouth. Sheryl M. of Missouri says that her dentist actually “prescribed” her to chew xylitol gum to correct the condition.

“I have always been a gum chewer, but had actually almost stopped chewing completely because almost ALL of the standard gum brands now have artificial sweeteners in them,” Sheryl said. “I was happy to find Glee.”
So grab a piece of all-natural, sugar-free Glee Gum. Your mouth will thank you!

Young child in winter coat looking up outside and smiling a very wide, toothy smile.

Candies That Don’t Cause Cavities–Too Sweet to Be True?

Candy and cavities are often thought to go hand-in-hand, tooth-in-tooth. According to the CDC, tooth decay (also known as dental cavities) is the most common chronic disease in children and teens. With February being National Children’s Dental Health Month, we thought we’d help answer an important question: Are there any candies that don’t cause cavities?

Sugar, which is used in most candy, lowers the PH in your mouth to an acidic level, thus breaking down the enamel on your teeth. Bacteria consume the sugars left behind in the mouth and the acid that results wears away at children’s teeth. So, in some cases, candy and other sugary treats can be contributing culprits in children’s cavities.

With our children in mind, Glee Gum offers a line of sugar-free natural chewing gum and Glee Tarts, both sweetened with xylitol. Xylitol is a naturally-occurring sugar alcohol found in most plant material. Over 25 years of testing suggest that using xylitol reduces tooth decay rates. It works by keeping the PH of the saliva in your mouth alkaline, where it should be.

Glee’s xylitol-sweetened tarts and gum mean that your kids can enjoy candy without the cavities! With all of its dental benefits, xylitol gives your smile a boost, too.

Chewing xylitol gum or enjoying tasty Glee Tarts are components of a well-rounded, healthy dental routine for children. Kids should be encouraged to floss and brush their teeth regularly to promote healthy dental hygiene.

Glee Gum makes 5 delicious xylitol sweetened gum flavors, including kid-friendly, fruity flavors like Watermelon, Bubblegum, and Lemon-Lime. Your kids are sure to love Glee Tarts too! Every box includes fruity pineapple, passion fruit, Meyer Lemon, and cherry flavors, all sweetened with natural xylitol to promote dental health. So your kids can have sweet, tasty candy, not cavities!

Sugar-Free Gum, Xylitol from Birch trees

Short and Sweet: Xylitol and Diabetes

In a time where sugar is found in almost everything we eat, being diabetic can be more than just inconvenient – it can be it can be downright torturous. That’s why we at Glee take great effort to offer natural Xylitol sweetened Sugar-Free choices of gum and candy to our customers, so that folks with a wide variety of dietary needs don’t have to go without a nice treat every now and again.

So why is Xylitol safe for use by diabetics? It goes back to something called the Glycemic index[1] (GI) – a scale that measures how foods with carbohydrates affect your blood sugar levels – how fast they rise and how fast they fall again. The higher the GI number, the faster the rate of metabolization, and the faster your blood sugar level will climb, and crash, after consuming. Since folks with diabetes are working hard to stabilize their blood sugar levels, it is often recommended that a person with diabetes follow a low GI diet.

There are 3 classifications for the Glycemic Index:

-55 or under is low

-56-69 is moderate

-70+ is high

For people with diabetes, or people who are pre-diabetic, it is recommended to follow a nutritious diet with a low to moderate glycemic index[2] to help prevent spikes and crashes. Chewing gum or eating sweets with a lower GI can help with this!

Here is a little example:

Glycemic index for table sugar:                   60-70

Glycemic index for Xylitol:                            approx.. 7

 

So, the next time you are looking for a low GI or low sugar treat, look no farther than Glee’s delicious Sugar-Free natural chewing gum in 5 flavors: SF Peppermint, SF Watermelon, SF Bubblegum, SF Wintergreen, and Sugar-Free Lemon Lime. And be sure to try our newest Xylitol treat: Sugar-Free Glee Tarts, with 4 yummy and low GI impact flavors: Cherry, Passion Fruit, Meyer Lemon, and Pineapple. Change to Sugar-Free Glee and Go Worry-Free!

[1] https://www.gisymbol.com/about-glycemic-index/

[2] http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/glycemic-index-and-diabetes.html

Sorry, Dogs: No Gum for You!

No gum for our beloved office dog Tenny!

We’re pleased to share a special guest post from our pals at Preventive Vet, a collective of veterinarians, respected trainers, and devoted pet lovers. Preventive Vet’s mission is to educate and spread awareness about simple ways we can keep our pets safe and healthy. One of those ways involves protecting dogs from xylitol, the natural sweetener used in Sugar-Free Glee Gum. Read on to learn why Sugar-Free Glee, and all products containing xylitol, should be kept far away from pooches– plus tips on how to do so, and what to do right away if your dog somehow manages to get your gum! 

Sugar-free gum and xylitol: Important awareness for dog lovers
Just what exactly is xylitol? It’s a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener and can be found in many sugar-free gums and other sugar-free, lo-carb, and “no artificial sweetener” treats. Xylitol is a common alternative to sugar because it doesn’t affect your blood sugar levels, and it has positive benefits for your teeth. Unfortunately, that’s not the case for our four-legged friends! Xylitol can be extremely dangerous to dogs, even in very small amounts.

If your dog decides to go for a taste of your sugar-free gum, sugar-free mints, peanut butter, or even lip balm or other cosmetics that may contain xylitol, there’s likely to be some very serious consequences. When a dog ingests xylitol, they can experience a rapid drop in blood sugar and damage to their liver, with symptoms including weakness, vomiting, seizures, bleeding abnormalities, and the risk of death. Not to mention, a very worried pet owner and an expensive stay in the Animal ER. Signs can come on in as little as 30 minutes, so time is truly of the essence!

How can I protect my pet from xylitol?
You can prevent a frightening situation by adopting these good habits.
• Hang jackets, bags, purses, and other bags in a closed closet, or high up and out of reach. A clever dog might figure out how to access your sugar-free goodies if they are left on a coffee table or in the pocket of a coat hanging off the back of a chair.

Dog Near Purse

• Consider a dog seatbelt or proper travel restraint when riding in the car. Not only does it keep your pup out of your purse (where he may find sugar-free gum, or a host of other common purse hazards) but it also keeps everyone safe in case of an accident or sudden stop.

• Be mindful about what you set on end tables, coffee tables, and nightstands, both in your home and when visiting a friend or neighbor’s house with a doggy resident.

• Throw out chewed gum in covered trashcans, because even chewed gum could still contain enough xylitol to cause harm to a dog that likes to go dumpster diving.

• Make sure your friends and neighbors are aware of the dangers of xylitol to dogs. Spreading the word will help to keep everyone’s dogs safe!

• Appreciate responsible companies like Glee who care about you and your pets enough to work with pet safety experts to spread awareness.

Husky

I think my dog ate my gum, now what?
Some dogs are very clever, and accidents can happen, so if you think your dog may have eaten a food or product that contains xylitol, be sure to:

  1. Take away any remaining gum or xylitol-containing product to prevent them from consuming any more than they already have.
  2. Check the labels to see if there is xylitol in the products they ate – not all gums contain xylitol. Fortunately, Glee very clearly lists on their packaging if a gum contains xylitol, as well as the amount per piece of gum.
  3. Call an animal-specific poison control hotline (either ASPCA-Animal Poison Control Center or Pet Poison Helpline) for advice on what to do and what to watch for. Tell them what he ate, how much of it he ate, and how long ago he ate it. Do this even if you’re unsure if the product your dog ate contained xylitol, and even if he seems normal. They are your best resources for information and peace of mind.
  4. If your dog shows symptoms like vomiting, staggering, weakness, seizures or other concerning signs, get to your vet ASAP, and bring the gum packaging if you can. If your vet is closed, head straight to the closest Animal ER. (Not sure where the nearest one is? Find one here.)

What about cats—is xylitol dangerous for them, too?
At the time of writing, there have been no reported cases of xylitol poisoning in cats, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s safe for cats to consume. It’s best to take the same precautions to keep gum away from prying paws, and contact your vet or poison control if your cat does get into any xylitol products.

Now that you have all the facts, you can safely protect your pets from xylitol while you continue enjoying your Glee Gum!

Golden Retriever